Working Outdoors HEAT STRESS

By December 31, 2015Public Blogs

Heat Stress


 

Make the Workplace Safer

  • Provide cool potable water.
  • Have shade available.
  • Have an emergency phone, like a cell phone, available to call9-1-1 in case of an emergency. Know your location. Follow Safe Work Practices
  • Watch for symptoms of heat stress including high body temperature, hot, dry skin, confusion, nausea, headaches, fatigue, and fainting.
  • Drink a minimum of 1 quart of cool potable water per hour.
  • Start drinking water at the beginning of work and don’t wait until you’rethirsty.
  • Stay away from drinks with caffeine such as coffee, alcohol and softdrinks.
  • Wear proper loose fitting clothing and dress for the weather conditions.
  • Acclimate yourself to the heat and don’t overwork. Allow time for yourbody to adjust.
  • Air temperature will increase if you’re working next to a source ofradiation, on a roof, in a trench, inside a vehicle, in a confined space,

    or on a street.

  • Check with your doctor if you’re taking any medications that mayadversely affect you while working outdoors. Some medications can

    increase the symptoms of heat stress.

  • NOTIFY YOUR SUPERVISOR IMMEDIATELY IF YOU HAVE ANYHEAT-RELATED SYMPTOMS. Personal Protective Equipment
  • Always wear the proper Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for the job.
  • Types, styles, and designs of PPE should be chosen based upon company policy, state law and the weatherconditions and surrounding present conditions.
  • NOTIFY YOUR SUPERVISOR IMMEDIATELY IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO WEAR ANY PPE.

DID YOU KNOW?

California state law requires employers to provide employees with drinking water and shade on days where the outside temperature exceeds 85 degrees in the shade.

View PDF Here

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